Vanilla dairy-free choc-chip ice cream recipe

Gordon Ramsay’s advice is that the best way to do homemade ice cream is to buy a really good vanilla ice cream then add toppings to it at home. Only, there’s no good dairy-free vanilla ice cream available here. So I decided to do my own. Also, I like the texture of chocolate chips, so I decided to add them during the churning.

This vanilla dairy-free choc-chip ice cream recipe was created out of necessity. I had dabbled at making ice cream at home before, when I lived in China, where there is no such thing as dairy-free ice cream (or even dairy-free sorbet). Every food of western origin gets milk added to the recipe over there. I think they think it makes it more authentic.

I had been a little spoilt living in America for 6 months, where a certain Mr. Ben and Mr. Jerry have created the most incredible range of dairy-free ice creams that are available in every one-horse (and thousand-horse) town I visited. I’m not proud of it but I developed a taste for American dairy-free ice cream. And in the UK, the supply of dairy-free ice cream was reasonable. Even in Malaysia I had no issue getting dairy-free ice cream.

But in Ireland, dairy-free ice cream is overpriced and there’s almost none of it available. Literally over the (non-border) in Strabane I can get 3 ASDA dairy-free imitation Magnums for £1.50 or a tub of Ben and Jerry’s cookie dough dairy-free ice cream for £2.99 (on offer) or £4.50 (normal price), which I think is quite a lot to pay. But in Ireland? That same tub of cookie dough costs €7! SEVEN EUROS! Seven. Euros. Or as I like to call it, daylight robbery. If you can even find a shop that sells it.

As I am currently pregnant, and it’s summer, I need ice cream like I need air to breathe. My attempts to make ice cream in China were okay, but not great. It turns out those recipes to make ice cream without an ice cream maker are blarney. So, since I am now in a country where it’s harder and more expensive to buy electricals, I decided I needed an ice cream maker. I crunched some numbers and it cost £32 (+ free delivery) for an ice cream maker, which is 4.5 tubs of Ben and Jerry’s at Supervalu prices.

So as long as I make only 2 litres of ice cream with my ice cream maker, it’s paid for itself.

This recipe comes out a little bit less vanilla than I’d like, but it works from ingredients you can find in your local Supervalu, Centra, or most small rural Irish shops (maybe not the local chipper), so I’ve sacrificed a little bit of flavour for making this a recipe you can make ANYWHERE in Ireland.

To vanilla it up some more, you do something with vanilla pods. Good luck finding vanilla pods in the arse end of the West Coast because I couldn’t.

Vanilla choc-chip ice cream recipe

Ingredients:

1 tin coconut milk (the type for making curries)

1 tsp vanilla essence

100g honey or other sweetener (don’t use granulated sugar, it will not dissolve at this temperature)

1 packet of chocolate chips (Sainsbury’s dark chocolate chips were dairy free when I last bought them)

Method:

Refrigerate the coconut milk overnight.

If you have a cheap ice-cream maker without a compressor, freeze the ice cream maker’s bowl according to manufacturer’s instructions (I recommend leaving it in there overnight).

Put the coconut milk, honey and vanilla essence into a blender and blend for 30 seconds (don’t add the chocolate chips yet).

Take the ice cream maker’s bowl out of the freezer, assemble the ice cream maker and add the mixture. Add the chocolate chips to the mixture. Let the mixture churn, it should take 7-12 minutes depending on your ice cream maker.

When the mixture starts to thicken into a texture that’s thicker than a dough but not quite completely solid, turn off the ice cream maker and immediately transfer your mixture to a freezable bowl. I have a pottery bowl with a plastic lid which I brought back from my two years in China. Freeze the mixture for an additional hour or two (or longer) and take out of the freezer for 10 minutes before serving. Makes about 500ml (just under 1 pint) of ice cream.

The biggest mistake I’ve seen people make in the reviews of cheap ice cream makers is they leave the mixture in the machine too long, expecting the machine to freeze it completely. If the mixture gets too hard, the electrics will break. A motor turns the paddles, and it doesn’t know to stop, so even when the mixture gets too hard to mix, the motor will still try and turn the paddles, until something snaps and then your ice cream maker won’t work. So it’s better to take it out a little early and freeze it the rest of the way. Remember, you only need the ice cream maker to churn your mixture, you have a perfectly good freezer that can freeze it (if you don’t have a freezer, you can’t make ice cream this way)!

Ice cream stores for up to 1 month.

Thursday Photo Challenge is Changing.

I’ve been doing these photo challenges for six months, now, and despite the fact that I’ve been part of the photography wordpress community, I wasn’t prepared for how bitchy and cliquey people can be. So far, I’ve had to delete more than a handful of really nasty, shitty comments from people who think they’re photographers, people sending me emails telling me who do I think I am running a photo challenge, and people telling other people to avoid participating in my challenge. In six months of running the Thursday Photo Challenge I have had ONE person share their (awesome) photos with me, and that was via Twitter.

Until I started this challenge, I always thought the WordPress Photography Community was a welcoming place where anyone could participate. Obviously, I was wrong about that. Apparently you have to be approved by the right people to be allowed to do photography on WordPress these days. It wasn’t like that when I started this blog in 2014, and I never got that vibe in all the years I participated in other photo challenges on WordPress, but times they have a-changed and some shitty, bitchy people have installed themselves as gatekeepers.

With that in mind, and given that my blog started 6 years ago so I could share my travel photos with my friends and also keep a log of how I did certain things like put up curtains in my car campervan, I’m going to continue posting my photos in relevant travel articles. Since I’m also a professional author and I largely don’t care to be part of the photography community if they’re going to be fifty-something men acting like the thirteen-year-olds in Mean Girls, I’m going to change my weekly Thursday posts to writing prompts.

Let me be clear. Nothing is STOPPING me from continuing to blog, but I can blog about anything I damn please and I am not interested in the pathetic drama that the photography community is sending my way so they can all get stuffed. Perhaps bitchy comments is why the original weekly photo challenge died a death. I’m sure a fiftysomething man called Roy will be along any minute now to enlighten us all about the things us mere female mortals could never possibly understand.

Mystery: Join the Thursday Photo Challenge!

Welcome! Come and join the Thursday Photo Challenge, a weekly photography challenge for everyone who likes to take photos! Oh, wow, I can’t believe this challenge marks six months of Thursday Photo Challenge! Time flies when you’re having fun.

This week’s challenge is a mystery.

Mystery creates wonder and wonder is the basis of man’s desire to understand.

Neil Armstrong

What photos can you take to depict a mystery? My photo comes from Angkor Wat, Cambodia. There are few explanations for anything at the huge site as you walk around. It’s all a mystery. You can learn more about Angkor Wat at the museum in Siem Reap, though.

Here’s how to take part:

  1. Take a photo or search your files for one that represents the week’s theme.
  2. Write a post, including your photo, any words of explanation or inspiration you wish to share, and a link to this challenge page.
  3. Comment on this post with a link to your page so others can see your contribution.
  4. That’s it! Super easy.

This challenge will stay open for one week, then next Thursday, I will post the next challenge!

Sleepy: Join the Thursday Photo Challenge

Welcome! Come and join the Thursday Photo Challenge, a weekly photography challenge for everyone who likes to take photos!

Good friends, good books and a sleepy conscience. This is the ideal life.

Mark Twain

This week’s theme is sleepy! What can you come up with?

My photo is from a rare animal rescue cafe in Seoul, South Korea. Basically, they took in rescued animals who had been bought as exotic pets then abandoned by their owners, and was completely funded by the money people paid to see them. It was like a cat cafe, but with different animals and a lot of strict rules like no touching the animals and no feeding them. This dog is so sleepy at the top of his slide!

Here’s how to take part:

  1. Take a photo or search your files for one that represents the week’s theme.
  2. Write a post, including your photo, any words of explanation or inspiration you wish to share, and a link to this challenge page.
  3. Comment on this post with a link to your page so others can see your contribution.
  4. That’s it! Super easy.

This challenge will stay open for one week, then next Thursday, I will post the next challenge!

9 Prehistoric sites you can day trip from York

The county of North Yorkshire has some pretty fantastic prehistoric sites. The City of York itself doesn’t really have anything but within an hour’s drive, there’s lots to see. If you want to visit Neolithic monoliths, Iron Age ceremonial mounds, Bronze age stone circles or prehistoric art in the form of cup and ring marks, you’ve found the right article.

I haven’t included most of these in my big list of 54 day trips from York, because I know a lot of people aren’t that interested in prehistory (I don’t understand them at all). The best part is, all of these are free, all you need is petrol money and lunch. If you’re not sure when each time period was, or its key features, you will find info below under the heading, “some dates”.

Because this is a travel article, I haven’t included some key North Yorkshire sites which archaeologists find important, such as Star Carr. This is because what makes these sites important is beneath the ground, while they’re being dug for the 4-12 weeks of digging season once a year. The rest of the time, you can’t see anything except the soil of the farmer’s fields covering them up. They are usually on private land, too. All of this makes it not practical or worthwhile to visit them in a day trip.

Places to see prehistoric stuff

I’ve included the nearest town so you can get an idea for where they are, because isn’t it really annoying when people just rattle off the names of prehistoric sites in the middle of nowhere and one could be in Cornwall while another is in Aberdeen.

Thornborough henge, nr. Ripon: A triple henge of three stone circles close to one another, along with a huge mile-long cursus (two ditches side by side creating a sort of pathway). At one point, it was apparently used for jousting and was known locally as “The Charging Ground.” The site is Neolithic, from at least 4,000BCE. Findable on Google Maps, but be aware extensive quarrying has taken place in the environs and the landscape beyond the stones therefore isn’t safe to free-explore.

Rudston Megalith, nr. Bridlington: I’ve talked about this one in my other article on day trips from York, because if you’re heading out toward Flamborough Head or Bempton, this is well worth a shufty. It’s an 8m tall megalith single-standing stone which is in a churchyard in the village of Rudston. If you’re into megaliths, you might want to make a day of it. Findable on Google Maps.

The Devils Arrows, nr. Boroughbridge: This is a small circle of three tall megalith standing stones. Dating to the late Neolithic, it is thought there were four or five stones originally. The tallest of the three is 7m high, and a Victorian excavation discovered it was buried a further 1.8m below the ground. According to local folklore, these are three actual giant arrows thrown by Old Nick himself in a spectacularly poor attempt at destroying the village of Aldborough. Founded in Roman times, Aldborough didn’t exist until thousands of years after the stones were put here. More likely, the legend sprung up around the superstitious time of the witch hunts and stuck. You can find it on Google maps.

Harwood Dale, nr. Ravenscar/Scarborough, North Yorkshire: Probably the nicest stone circle to photograph on this list, at 14m around you can fit a nice amount of stones into one shot. Bronze Age Harwood Dale is locally known as the Druid’s Circle. It is not, however, a typical circle. It is a Bronze Age burial cist, a stone-built box shape where human remains would have been buried. There are three upright stones in the centre. Two more cup-and-ring marked stones from the vicinity were taken to Scarborough Museum in Victorian times and the rest of the site was seemingly forgotten. More details and a map reference here.

Ramsdale Stone Circle, nr. Robin Hood’s Bay, North Yorkshire: Only three stones make up this tiny stone circle, which makes it fascinating and easy to look at in its entirety (unlike gigantic circles such as Long Meg and Her Daughters, in Cumbria, or Avebury, in Avebury). It has been suggested that the three stones once formed part of a burial cairn, or that they were originally a larger stone circle, but the truth is that no one knows. More info and map reference here (not marked on Google maps).

Simon Howe, nr. Goathland, N. Yorks: This visually intriguing stone circle has a more recent addition, in the form of a modern cairn like the ones you see at the top of many mountains frequented by ramblers. It’s due south of Goathland (where you can also find the Mallyan Spout waterfall). I have attempted to add it to Google Maps so hopefully it will be more findable for other people. If not, get the map reference and inspiring photos here.

High Bridestones, nr. Goathland, N. Yorks: While you’re here, the road above Goathland also has two more Bronze Age sites. High Bridestones is four standing stones and they are thought to be what is left of two circles that have been joined together. North of it sits Low Bridestones. Get the deets here.

Brow Moor Carved Stones, nr. Ravenscar, N. Yorks: The rock art at Brow Moor is incredible. These stones were carved in the Bronze age and they are highly striking, speckled with lots of small dots (cups) and some bigger circles (rings) and even concentric circles known as double rings. If you’re into prehistoric rock art, this is a worthwhile day out. Photos and map reference here.

Blakey Topping, nr. Scarborough, N. Yorks: This intriguing and mysterious site has been suggested to be a sacred hill. From the top, you can see another potential sacred hill to the southeast (Howden Hill). A sacred hill is a relatively new class of ancient monument, and there’s no consensus yet on whether they exist or not. Blakey Topping has four standing stones at the top.

Legend has it that Blakey Topping was created by Wade the Giant, who was angry at his wife Bell and scooped up soil from the Hole of Horcum to throw at her. Blakey Topping was created where the soil landed, along with some other local hills. Looking at the shape of the hill and how it fits into the landscape, it is clearly a man-made hill, with a very uniform shape and a flat top typical of Iron Age earthworks, although it could be older. Well worth a look and there are loads of walking guides if you DuckDuckGo Blakey Topping hill. Photos and map reference here.

Some dates:

Neolithic: 4000-2500BCE Britain transitioned from a marine-based diet to livestock farming. Inland settlements became more permanent as the same land could feed people year-round with domesticated cattle. Stone tools still the norm.

Bronze Age: 2500-800BCE Metallurgy was invented and bronze could be forged into shapes to take the place of stone tools. Archaeologists have found many ceremonial burials from this period.

Iron Age: 800BCE to 43AD Iron smelting replaced bronze, allowing metal production to be faster and the tools to be better as iron is harder than bronze. Iron age forts abound in the English landscape but for most of them, all that remains is a big hill with no trace of what it looked like, because stone wasn’t used widely for building until the Romans arrived.

The Romans arrived 43AD, bringing an end to the stone monuments and circle building traditions of the past and eventually blanketing England in Christianity. Also started writing stuff down and calling it “history”.

5 places where you can see Roman remains in York (3 are free)

York is a city famous for its rich history. However, York’s Roman past can be hard to find on your first trip to the city, as most of the historic buildings are younger. Here is a list of five places where you can see some real Roman remains in York (three of them are free) and a little bit of York’s Roman history!

The Roman city of York was founded in 71AD as an outpost fort and later a city called Eboracum. The Roman Empire was quite late to Britain. Rome had colonised Spain in 206BC, the Greeks in 146BC and France in the 1st century BC, yet they didn’t manage to take Britain until 43AD. Only Germany was conquered later- a defeat that ultimately led to the downfall of the Roman Empire, but that’s a topic for another time.

The Romans extensively colonised the south of England, but their presence in the north was less established, because of the perpetual threat from the Picts in what is now Scotland. Additionally, the cost of over-extending the Roman Republic was starting to take its toll on Rome’s ability to defend itself in every direction, due both to money and manpower.

When the Roman Empire went into decline and withdrew between 405 and 420AD, York remained populated, and ultimately grew into the city you see today.

It is estimated that only two per-cent of ancient Eboracum has been excavated. This is because the city expanded enormously during the medieval period and a lot of this was built over the remains of the older, Roman city.

I love discovering aspects of a city’s past, especially somewhere like York where there’s so much of it. Here are five places with Roman remains that you can find yourself (three are free) on your York adventure, plus a sixth bonus statue that isn’t Roman, but it’s of a Roman Emperor.

Roman Baths

The Roman baths are, funnily enough, situated beneath the floor of the pub Roman Bath. What you will see here are the excavated remains (you can’t take a bath here). You will spot them immediately on entering the pub.

If you’re wondering, the type of bath here was most likely a balneae, a small public or private bath, not a grand Imperial thermae. This bath was used by the Roman army which occupied York, and was probably built by them. The remains of other Roman baths have been found around the city, but the ones at Roman Bath pub are the only ones that you can go and see. If you visit, remember this is a pub and a business. You don’t need to pay entry, but you can support the bath by buying a drink.

Roman Column

An 8m tall column sits outside the Minster. It was one of many which supported the Basilica–a huge Roman building. The Roman Column was discovered in 1969, during excavations around York Minster. It was raised and left on display near where it was found. It was donated to the city by the Dean and Chapter. Unfortunately, the builders made a terrible mistake and it is, in fact, upside-down.

To find it, head to the main entrance of York minster. From the entrance, locate the black metal gates that can be used to close the road. The column is on the right of the railings, near the school. Free access 24/7.

The Basilica

More of the Basilica can be seen in the Undercroft of York Minster, where the foundations have been excavated. The Basilica was built in 100AD, only 29 years after Eboracum was founded. It was a huge civic building intended for use as a courthouse and other public functions. Usually, basilicas were sited next to a forum, but none has been discovered in York, yet (also missing: York’s Colosseum).

You can visit the Undercroft by going inside the Minster and buying a ticket. There are three different areas of the Minster with separate tickets; be sure to get a ticket specifically for the Undercroft to see the Roman remains of York’s basilica.

The Roman wall

The Romans built walls around many of their settlements. Most archaeologists will tell you walls are there to keep invaders out, but Bar-Yosef put forward an alternative idea in 1986 which deserves more attention; walls can be used as a flood defence and to prevent mud flows damaging the city. Walls also keep people in. It is much easier to control a population when they can’t simply get up and leave, and it’s also easier to find criminals and to accurately collect taxes inside a walled city.

Most of the Roman wall actually lies beneath the Medieval wall you can walk on. The Roman remains are tucked within the embankment that holds up the Medieval walls. But in a little green area, beside a car park on Museum Street, there’s an exposed area of the original Roman walls. From the art gallery, walk to the gate of King’s Manor and don’t go inside. Instead, go left along the pavement toward the theatre (don’t cross the road).

The Roman wall is immediately on your right.

The Yorkshire Museum

Of course, you’re going to find a lot more of York’s Roman artefacts if you visit a museum. The Yorkshire Museum holds quite a collection of small finds, including the reconstructed Coppergate helmet (which the reconstructors got wrong, I believe the museum now goes into detail on this). There are also Roman sarcophagi and other large items like a mosaic floor and a wall fresco. I think a better way to present the past is to do what they do in Athens and leave it in-situ but put protective glass over it, so the past becomes part of today’s buildings, retaining the context of where they were found. However, this is why I don’t work in a museum.

So there you have it. Five places you can see York’s Roman past.

And the sixth (not quite Roman)…

As a bonus, check out the statue of Constantine outside the Minster. This isn’t a Roman find, but was created later to memorialise the Emperor due to his ties with the city. His father Emperor Constantius is one of two Roman emperors who died in the City of York (the other is the African-Roman who became Emperor of Rome, Septimus Severus). Constantine the Great (pictured below) was the first Christian Emperor of Rome, legitimising the religion in 312AD and paving the way for its widespread acceptance in Europe.

CC Zero

6 Best Picnic Spots in York

If you’ve brought a picnic to York (or bought takeaway food), the biggest city in North Yorkshire, at some point you will be looking for somewhere to eat it. One thing you will definitely want to do is sit down. You can’t move for cafes in York these days, but nothing beats just sitting on a bench and eating a picnic.

There are loads of benches dotted around the city centre but my criteria for inclusion on this list was that a family of at least three people could comfortably eat together. Many of the city centre benches are full of people non-stop, and pigeons are a problem, too, such as around Parliament street.

To make this list, the picnic spot had to give you a half-decent chance of eating without being robbed by a pigeon and without someone trying to sit on you. It also had to be within the walls or very close to a landmark or place of interest.

At some of these locations, you can unfurl a blanket to sit on the grass but at most of them, you will need to keep your picnic in its bag and pull out what you want to eat individually.

Remember to always find a bin to throw your rubbish away and don’t be a litterbug!

At places with grass to sit on, use your common sense and judgement, examine the area before laying your blanket down to check for duck, squirrel or dog poo (or other nasties).

Here are the 6 best spots to eat a picnic in York:

  1. Tower Gardens, York: Across the road from Clifford’s Tower hides a tiny park where you can sit and contemplate things. There’s a cafe by the river, here, so if plans change and you need a hot coffee or cake, you can find those, too. Benches, or grass if you want to set out a blanket, although there might be duck poo as it’s next to the river.
  2. Dame Judi Dench Walk, York: On the other side of the city, if you go down the stone steps to the left of the York Museum Gardens, you can find a riverside walk with plenty of places to sit and rest.
  3. York Minster Gardens (aka Dean’s Park): To the left of the inspiring York Minster lies the Minster Gardens. You can sit here amid tranquil surroundings and regroup before your afternoon activities. Benches, or grass for picnic blankets.
  4. York Museum Gardens: This is a fabulous place to sit down with a picnic. There are squirrels to feed as well, as well as the ruins of St. Mary’s Abbey. Benches, or grass for picnic blankets.
  5. Memorial Gardens: On the other side of the river, near the railway station, the Memorial Gardens are an especially convenient place to eat a picnic if you’re headed to the National Railway Museum. Benches, or grass for picnic blankets.
  6. The John Snow Memorial: Found on Wellington Row, this small and out-of-the-way memorial park has benches and a river view.

That’s my top 6 spots to eat a picnic in York. Which is yours? Let me know in the comments!

54 Easy Day Trips From York

York is perfectly situated for a range of day trips in North Yorkshire, from Knaresborough to the Vale of Pickering, and from Whitby to Bridlington. Here are forty of the many places you can visit in a day from York. All of these will take an hour or less to drive to (unless bad traffic), except Whitby which is 1 hour 10 from York by car. Sites owned by National Trust or English Heritage are noted for those with passes.

Obviously availability of indoor attractions is varying like a yoyo in 2021, but this article is written to be timeless for the future so do check the relevant attraction’s website if your heart is set on going inside something.

Harrogate and Knaresborough Area:

To the west of York lies Harrogate, famed as a Victorian spa. It’s not a very touristy town anymore but neighbouring Knaresborough and environs are simply packed with amazing and unique things to do if you’re looking for a North Yorkshire day trip.

Mother Shipton’s Cave: Mother Shipton was a famous witch (or “prophetess”) in the area. The cave is beside the Petrifying Well, which is a mineral-rich water source that turns things into stone.

Knaresborough Castle: A 14th century ruined castle with stunning views. Car parking is available. There is a beautiful walk from the castle down to the river.

Aldborough Roman Site: This is the remains of a Roman town in the village of Aldborough, just outside Boroughbridge. The Roman site is complete with mosaics, the original town wall, along with a museum, all sited within a Victorian arboretum which was created around the town’s remains. English Heritage.

Spofforth Castle, Spofforth: A 13th century ruined castle in Spofforth, between Wetherby and Harrogate. It’s the sort of ancient ruin you can take a picnic and explore with the whole family, very exciting for children. Open 24/7. English Heritage.

RHS Garden Harlow Carr: A Royal Horticultural Society gardens offering the chance to see rare and local plants cultivated in a scenic environment. They have a garden centre where you can get RHS seeds and gardening stuff. There’s also a Betty’s cafe.

Chapel of Our Lady of the Crag, Knaresborough: A stunning and uniquely-designed 15th Century Catholic chapel that is carved into the cliff-face.

Stockeld Park: A fab play park and farm where children can play. There’s also a maze and an enchanted forest.

Nidd Gorge: A verdant forest in the valley beside a river with walks and wildlife. There are also traces of Iron Age occupation in the area. Can be visited by itself or incorporated into the longer Knaresborough to Ripley Castle walk. Maintained by the Woodland Trust. Parking available. Free entry.

Nidd Gorge Viaduct: Further North West of Nidd Gorge is the Nidd Gorge Viaduct, a feat of engineering that’s part of the route to Ripley Castle.

Ripley Castle: A privately-owned castle with a long and fascinating history. It makes a fab end point for a walk from Knaresborough (approximately 6.5 miles one way). Adult and children’s tours available as well as grounds/gardens to explore.

Knaresborough Viaduct: An easier to find viaduct can be found in Knaresborough town near the train station, and with the railway line now running across it.

Knaresborough Blenkhorn’s Boat Hire: Hire wooden boats with long oars and enjoy punting down the river at a relaxed pace.

Little Pasture Pony Trekking Knaresborough: Would you like to go pony trekking through the scenic North Yorkshire countryside with an experienced instructor? This is the place to go. Full days or two-hour hacks available, tailored to your experience and ability.

Scarborough Area:

Venturing north-east from York, you will come to Scarborough, North Yorkshire. A day trip to this seaside town offers an incredible range of things to do and you could easily spend a week here!

Scarborough castle: An English Heritage-owned castle dating to the 12th century, built on a site that has been occupied since 1000BC. The castle is now a ruin because it was the site of a bitter siege during the 1645 English Civil War, which saw half the tower destroyed. I visited on a very foggy day which only added to the mystique. English Heritage.

Sea Life Scarborough: An aquarium with various sea creatures, situated to the north-west of the town. Children will especially enjoy visiting.

Alpamare water park: Waterslides and other water park fun along with parking and a cafe. Ideal for families.

Scarborough beach: A long sandy beach where you can swim or splash in the sea, or just sit on the shore and build a sandcastle. Gets very busy in summer.

Anne Brontë’s grave (St. Mary’s church): When people think of the Brontë sisters, they usually know only Charlotte and Emily, the authors of Jane Eyre (and more) and Wuthering Heights, respectively. The third sister (of five, but only the three lived to adulthood with their brother) was Anne, who wrote Agnes Grey and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall before dying at only 29. Her grave is in this churchyard, if you wish to pay your respects.

The Secret Garden, Scarborough: This is a beautiful garden tucked away from the main streets. There are flowers, a graveyard, and wild, natural plants which give it an uncultivated feel.

Oliver’s Mount War Memorial and Viewing Point: This high point has a memorial to the soldiers who died in World War I and II, and also presents stunning views of the town and across the bay.

Shuttleworth Gardens: This Victorian garden has a sensory garden, originally intended for the blind, but will also appeal to other visitors such as young babies, people with learning disabilities etc who can experience the garden without the need to process visual information.

Playdale Farm Park: A fun day out for children, the Playdale Farm Park has farm animals to see and little rides for tiny people.

Burton Riggs Nature Reserve: A big open space with a lake and wetlands where water birds frequently visit. There are also foxes and badgers (do not approach these). Floods regularly. Take wellies unless there’s a current hosepipe ban in force in the area.

West Ayton Castle: A derelict ruin almost lost to time, this was once a 15th century castle. Constructed in 1410 by Sir Ralph Eure, the design is based on a pele tower, a type of defensive fortification. No one knows why he built it like this although it was built right in the middle of the Hundred Years’ War between the houses Plantagenet and Lancaster, who were vying for control of England amongst their other goals.

Scarborough Fair Collection Vintage Transport Museum: This is a beautiful private collection of Victoriana with a fairground and vintage rides.

Whitby Area:

Due North from York, Whitby hardly needs much introduction. It was featured in Bram Stoker’s Dracula, a fact the town is hugely proud of and which inspired the annual Whitby Goth Festival. The town is fun to free-explore without a plan.

Nowadays, Whitby is famous for having the best fish and chips in Britain, and there is plenty of choice when looking for a chip shop. It’s also famous for Whitby Jet, a fossilised wood polished by the sea, which is used locally in jewellery. You can pick up a Whitby jet souvenir at several different shops. Here are some of the many day trips in the Whitby area:

Whitby Abbey: Originally a seventh century monastery, it later became a Benedictine abbey. It became a ruin due to the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII in the 1530s. This huge site is still impressive as a ruin and it still has lots of architectural details from the Gothic style as the remains you see today were built in the 1220s. English Heritage.

199 Steps: This is a pathway to Whitby Abbey which goes upwards from a bit above sea level all the way to the striking height of the hill where the abbey is sited. Stunning views, and an interesting graveyard and church near the top. Free and well worth the mild exertion.

Captain Cook Memorial Museum: An unusual museum to find in the North of England, this small museum is set in the house where Cook was apprenticed. It covers famous explorer Captain Cook’s life and his voyages to the South Pacific. A must-see.

Whitby Museum: A big museum covering history of the local area. Particularly good if you’re interested in fossils or Whitby Jet (a type of petrified wood which is locally made into jewellery).

Whitby beach: A beach which includes two lighthouses at the mouth of the river Esk. Don’t miss the Captain Cook memorial on the North Beach.

Robin Hood’s Bay: A fascinating cove town 6 miles below Whitby with a history of smuggling (not great for the mobility impaired) with a very long, steep walk to the sea. Town also has a museum. It’s the end of the Coast-to-Coast walk (one of Wainwright’s).

Bridlington area:

Bridlington is just over the border in East Riding of Yorkshire, and there are several day trips you can make to this neck of the woods.

Flamborough Head: A stunning and beautiful beach at the split between two cliffs. At low tide, there are caves you can explore. Usually not as busy as other areas of the coast.

RSPB Bempton: Do you love puffins? Have you ever wanted to see them in the wild? This is the place to go to see puffins! Take some good binoculars and a coat, standing at the cliff-top, it can get quite chilly from the wind.

Sewerby Hall: A lovely example of a Georgian country house and gardens, this is especially worth visiting for its small zoo which has Humboldt Penguins among other animals. The house has interactive displays where children can get involved by dressing up as servants or householders, and there’s even an Edwardian playroom they can play in.

Burton Agnes Hall: A grand Tudor house with a walled garden and a vast art collection. The garden is quite visually striking and children love it. Nice cafe with local produce.

Rudston Monolith: A prehistoric megalith that stands in the churchyard of All Saints Church. This is the tallest standing stone in Britain (7.1m or 25 feet) and dates to the Late Neolithic or Early Bronze Age period. The source for the stone is 10 miles (16km) away in Cornelian Bay. Free entry but be respectful of the fact it’s in a churchyard.

Malton/Pickering area:

The Vale of Pickering and surrounding area is known for tiny villages each with its own unique charm. There are also a range of day trips. Some of these are quite out of the way and most of these would need about 5-6 hours, which would equate to a full day on my itinerary as I don’t like over-packing activities until they become box-ticking exercises.

Eden Camp Modern History Museum: Eden Camp was formerly a POW camp for foreign prisoners of war during World War II. Now it’s a modern history museum. There’s a play area for children.

Flamingoland: My favourite attraction in North Yorkshire is Flamingoland (I reviewed it here). This is a zoo with a theme park. This zoo has giraffes, bactrian camels, penguins, zebras, and of course, lots of flamingos.

Dalby Forest: This is an 8,000-acre forest. You can hike, picnic, climb trees or even follow one of the mountain bike trails.

Pickering Castle: The grounds of this thirteenth-century ruined castle are huge. The castle itself is impressive with stunning views of the local countryside. Well worth a visit. English Heritage.

Nunnington Hall: A Yorkshire manor house developed from a Tudor hall with organic gardens. National Trust.

Castle Howard and Yorkshire Arboretum: A ginormous country estate with endless gardens and a big house. The arboretum (120 acres of trees) is part of the estate but they are run as separate attractions.

Kirkham Priory: Founded in 1120, this Augustinian priory is now a stunning ruin. Another one that was destroyed during Henry VIII’s dissolution of the monasteries in the 1530s. English Heritage.

Helmsley Castle: This dates to the 1100s but later was the site of a Tudor house. It has an impressive sculpture garden. English Heritage.

Rievaulx Abbey: The remains of a Cistercian abbey. Annoyingly it has been split so Rievaulx Abbey is English Heritage but…

Rievaulx Terrace: An eighteenth-century garden with a folly and views of the abbey. There’s no joint Rievaulx ticket because the terrace is National Trust and the two heritage organizations have to be subscribed to and paid for separately. No other country in the world does this with their national monuments.

Selby area:

The Selby area is noticeably different from the rest of North Yorkshire. There are fewer things to see and do in this area than North or East of York. Having said that, Selby is a pleasant old market town to visit.

Selby Abbey: A medieval abbey that survived the Dissolution of the Monasteries intact but was half was ruined in the English Civil War. In 1906 it was badly damaged in a fire and this was used as an opportunity to completely reconstruct the abbey. A lot of what you see today is reconstruction rather than original, but it’s very convincing.

ROC Cawood: A Royal Observer Corps outpost. These are underground listening posts that were used during the Cold War between 1955-1991, although many of these were still manned throughout the 90s and into the 2000s. It was abandoned due to flooding. You obviously can’t get inside but there are some traces above ground.

Drax Power Station: A fully-functioning power station with huge cooling towers, mostly fuelled by biomass. You can go on guided tours and also visit their nature reserve. Not great for autism/anyone who cannot abide extremely loud noises as some areas are very loud. You do get ear protection but it’s still difficult for the non-NT.

Under 30 min drive from York:

Outside the walls of the city centre, these mini-adventures should take less than 30 minutes to drive to, traffic permitting. The traffic management in York city centre is notoriously abysmal however, so the actual journey time may vary, especially during peak times.

Yorkshire Air Museum: A former RAF bomber command station from WWII. Now a museum with 60 different military aircraft. Also has a wildlife walk.

Piglets Adventure Farm: A fun kids attraction with goats, baby chicks, bunnies and newborn piglets. There are also fun activities, a farmyard trail, a beach, crazy golf, and rides on farm-type vehicles and go-karts.

Beningbrough Hall: A Georgian stately home featuring gardens and artwork on long-term loan from the National Portrait Gallery. National Trust.

York Cold War Bunker: Situated in Holgate, this underground nuclear bunker is a fascinating trip back in time. The fixtures are all original and the guides extremely knowledgable. English Heritage, but not too commercialised (as of my last visit).

Holgate Windmill: Near the Cold War bunker you will find this 18th century windmill. You can only go inside on specific dates as it is still producing flour today.

So that’s my list of 54 things you can do in a day trip to North Yorkshire, starting from York. I haven’t included anything from West Yorkshire because I want to write a separate article on that at some point. Which is your favourite? Let me know in the comments!


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23 Things To Do In York


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Here is a list of 23 things you can do in York. It includes all the main tourist attractions and then some… [read more]

10 Free things To Do In York

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Top 5 places to eat vegan in York

For the longest time, El Piano was York’s vegan restaurant. There was only one. The food was incredible. Sadly, they have closed down, now. But there are other vegan eateries these days. Most food places do vegan options, but these ones offer an outstanding experience. Do remember to book, few restaurants in York can accommodate walk-ins for dinner:

The Orchid Vegan Restaurant, Rougier Street, York: 100% vegan. It’s a bit out of the way but worth it if you want to pick anything at all from the menu with confidence. Their ethos is imitation meat, not vegetable dishes, so take it or leave it, and that’s certainly a minor criticism compared to the value of a fully vegan restaurant with zero chance of cross-contamination. Also, they have vegan desserts.

Source, 1 Castlegate, York: A fantastic selection of vegan food and alcoholic drinks alongside other options.

Kalpakavadi Indian Restaurant, Fossgate, York: A South Indian restaurant which offers a choice of vegan dishes and servers are happy to assist you with these.

Double Dutch pancake house, 7 Church Street, York: A whole vegan menu including vegan pancakes. You really feel welcome here as a vegan.

The Yak and Yeti, 63A Goodramgate, York: Nepalese restaurant offering traditional vegan options alongside meaty dishes.

Spot: Join the Thursday Photo Challenge

Welcome! Come and join the Thursday Photo Challenge, a weekly photography challenge for everyone who likes to take photos!

This week’s challenge is spot.

Within your heart, keep one still, secret spot where dreams may go.

Louise Driscoll

Do you have a favorite spot? A spot where you love to hang out? A spot where you enjoy walking? A spot of tea? Spot the Dog? Do you love spotting birds? Or you could take this literally and show me a spotty dog (Edinburgh slang for a dalmatian) or spotty wallpaper. Let’s be dotty about spots, this week!

My photo is of the sunset on Christmas Eve 2017 in Pattaya beach, Thailand. It was a great spot to just let go and have a quiet holiday at a point when my husband and I were living in China and working very long hours.

What can you come up with?

Here’s how to take part:

  1. Take a photo or search your files for one that represents the week’s theme.
  2. Write a post, including your photo, any words of explanation or inspiration you wish to share, and a link to this challenge page.
  3. Comment on this post with a link to your page so others can see your contribution.
  4. That’s it! Super easy.

This challenge will stay open for one week, then next Thursday, I will post the next challenge!