7 things to do in York with young kids

York is not known for being the most child-friendly of places. From posh restaurants that don’t appeal to little ones, to shops with displays of expensive, brittle ornaments pouring off the shelves, to uneven pavements and kerbs that are definitely not pushchair-friendly, to zero play areas anywhere within the walls where kids can let off steam, this city can be stressful for parents of young children. However, there are things you can do with your preschoolers that they will enjoy:

Follow The Wiggles Trail:

Okay, I totally invented this one, but if your children are fans of The Wiggles, you can take them on the short (perfect for small legs) Wiggly Trail and let them sing the classic songs from the TV show Ready, Steady, Wiggle when they reach all the spots on the trail. The best part? The walking will tire them out! I have full details and a map in this post. Oh, and it’s also free!

Visit DIG:

If your child is old enough to hold a spoon and follow simple instructions without attempting to eat every non-food object they see, they will probably love DIG. It’s an interactive sort-of museum where children can do play-archaeology indoors without actually getting dirty. It’s really educational and super-fun. Entrance on St. Saviourgate behind Stonebow.

Jorvik Viking Museum

Do I need to introduce this one? This is what you’re going to York for, right? If not, you need to know any trip to York is incomplete without going to this essential museum. Entry is not cheap, and you may have to queue if you don’t book advance tickets, but this place is worth it. There’s a ride where you get to see Viking scenes then a museum-type area with re-enactors who can tell you all about what life was like in Viking times. Children will love this.

Looking for somewhere to sit down?

Once you’ve done some big touristy stuff at Jorvik and Dig, or between them, you might be thinking about heading over to the York Museum Gardens. However, it’s across the other side of the city centre, so it might take a while for very little legs to get there, so if you’re at Jorvik with preschoolers, that’s a great starting place to go to Tower Park, instead, which is where my Wiggly trail begins. Follow the trail toward King’s Staith then you’re perfectly situated to go and find some lunch at one of York’s many cafés or restaurants, then head back toward The Shambles for a trip down a real medieval street.

The Harry Potter shops in The Shambles

If you have school-age kids, instead of heading to Tower Park, wander toward The Shambles, York’s most picturesque and original medieval street. The first two shops are both Harry Potter-themed and children who are fans of the films or books will find these fascinating. The Shambles itself will be quite busy in the middle of the day, so plan for it to take about 10 minutes to get down this small road. At the other end, head out into King’s Square and you will find…

York’s Chocolate Story

This is a chocolate museum. Did you know both Rowntree and Nestle are headquartered in York? This museum tells the history of York’s chocolate-making industrial past and has lots of bright and colourful displays for children.

After York’s Chocolate Story, keep going past the Minster and through a bar (gate) in the walls, and you will reach…

The fountain at Exhibition Square, Museum Street:

This fountain has lots of jets of water and is tons of fun for little ones who can splash their hands in the edge of the water and also watch the water jets. At night, the water is lit up with coloured lights. Be water safe and never leave children unsupervised near water. From here, head down a little alleyway/footpath to the left of the big railings of King’s Manor. This path will take you straight into…

York Museum Gardens

This is a great place to feed squirrels, and is a big open space where children can run around and play, although for some reason, there’s no actual play park. The Museum Gardens are open daily until 5pm and includes the ruins of St. Mary’s Abbey, a Benedictine abbey that’s fun to see up close. If you have a picnic, this is the perfect place to have it. Free entry. If it rains, why not step inside the museum, instead (museum not free)?


Recommended

A Wiggly Trail, York

Does your child love The Wiggles as much as mine does? If so, here’s a Wiggly treat for you!

Aside from being a very historic city, York was also the filming location for more than a handful of the songs in the TV show Ready, Steady, Wiggle featuring the world’s favourite preschool band, The Wiggles… read full article

York’s Computer Museum

When people say “best kept secret” they usually mean “tourist hotspot,” but the computer museum (called The Jim Austin Computer Collection, or the Computer Sheds) in Fimber, about 40 minutes out of York, is York’s best kept secret, and it’s anything but busy. In fact, we should keep it between you and I. I would be pretty sad if it suddenly became a major tourist attraction because as it is, it’s pretty much the best collection of artefacts that I’ve ever seen (and all the guys who keep it running were only too happy to talk computers with our group of 5 people who ventured out of York). I’d wanted to see this collection since 2008, when I first heard about it, but this was my first opportunity to do so, and I’m glad I did (and that I went with a bunch of people who knew more stuff about old computers than I do – and I’m pretty enthusiastic about them).

Jim Austin Computer Collection York Computer Sheds

Jim Austin Computer Collection York Computer Sheds

One of the best things about this place is that it hasn’t had “museum heritage management” done to it yet; it’s still got that sense of discovery, you’re not just seeing what some overpaid museum education officer wants you to see, you get to see everything. And touch some of it (if you’re careful and sensible). There’s other electronic equipment besides computers – televisions, cameras and radio equipment are also represented in the collection.

Jim Austin Computer Collection York Computer Sheds

Jim Austin Computer Collection York Computer Sheds

Jim Austin Computer Collection York Computer Sheds
A 1917-1920 wireless (radio) receiver device.

There’s no cafe, there’s no gift shop, no ticket office, and no twee middle aged women reiterating the same 5 facts every 20 minutes to new tour groups; there’s just boatloads of computers, and the people who love them (and they do actually have a boat). It’s fitting, because that’s really how the whole computer movement has progressed. There are so many stories of “Windows started out as two enthusiastic guys in a garage,”  “Apple started out as three enthusiastic guys in a garage,” and so on, that if this place got the proper museum treatment, I’d be sad.

Jim Austin Computer Collection York Computer Sheds

Jim Austin Computer Collection York Computer Sheds

Jim Austin Computer Collection York Computer Sheds retro motherboard

Jim Austin Computer Collection York Computer Sheds
This unassuming device is what was used to make punch cards (the input in very old computers).

Jim Austin Computer Collection York Computer Sheds punch tape
And this is some punch tape (which would have been done on a different machine to the one pictured above).

The Jim Austin Computer Collection reminds me of why I fell in love with archaeology – and exactly why I have no intention of working in a museum. This stuff is real, it feels real, it’s being taken care of by people who know about it, and I recognized loads of the stuff that was there. More than that, it felt alive. There’s no arbitrary reductionism going on to cheapen the past to make it more palatable for people with short attention spans. I wish I could say the same for most museums.

But if this place did become a ticketed, gift-shopped museum, I think it’s the one museum I’d actually enjoy working at.

I have more photos, but since the majority of my readers are not computer enthusiasts, I shall save them for another time.

If you are in the area and would like to visit the Jim Austin Computer Collection, further details can be found at their website. Personally I found this to be a great day out, although I wouldn’t recommend it for (chronological) children unless they’re sensible and very well behaved. Entry is free but it would probably be polite to get in touch in advance so someone’s there to open up the place for you.

Twelve Inspiring Sunsets

To follow up yesterday’s post, I thought I’d post some sunsets today.  I wanted to write about Newgrange but the hundred or so photos I’d taken have all mysteriously disappeared.  And I’m probably not going back any time in the near future as I have a LOT of other places on my 30 list (a list I wrote when I was 18, of all the things I want to do before I turn 30) to go to.  So, instead, here are lots of pictures of sunsets I’ve collected from England and Scotland (the last one’s from St Paul’s Cathedral, Vatican City, photographed from Rome).  Enjoy.

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Sunset behind Ben Nevis (obscured by clouds), Scotland.
Sunset behind Ben Nevis (obscured by clouds), Scotland.

My mum used to call this colour "sky blue pink."  It was her favourite colour.
My mum used to call this colour “sky blue pink.” It was her favourite colour.

Sunset behind St Paul's Cathedral, the Vatican, Rome.
Sunset behind St Paul’s Cathedral, the Vatican, Rome.

All these photos are my own, and you can use them for whatever you like (please consider acknowledging that you found them on Invoke Delight).  I did stamp the Vatican one because I’ve used it a few times before; it’s one of my favourite travel photos.