180+ side hustles you can start at home as a mompreneur

Here I present over 180 side hustles you can start at home. So some of these require some skills and a passion for improving a craft. The list is designed to provide inspiration so something might click and you can go do more research. These are all 100% real jobs and if you’re passionate about them and learn to market yourself and get good at your job (and stick at it, in some cases), you can turn any of these into a full-time income or six-figure salary.

Blogging

1. Travel blogger

2. Beauty blogger

3. Lifestyle blogger

4. Mommy blogger

5. Food blogger (usually reviews of eating out)

6. Recipe blog

7. Kid with problem blog (e.g. Andrew has a peanut allergy)

8. Mental health blog

9. Photography blog

10. Art blog

11. Music blog

12. Homesteading blog

13. Gardening blog

14. Prepping blog (yep, it’s a big thing)

15. Fashion blog

16. Political/rant blog

17. Writing blog

18. Teaching blog

Author/Writer

19. Romance author

20. Erotica author

21. Mystery/Crime author

22. Thriller author

23. Sci-fi author

24. Fantasy author

25. YA author

26. Children’s book author

27. Picture book author

28. Nonfiction author

29. Ghostwriter

30. Book outline writer

31. Copywriter

32. Post writer

33. PA (personal assistant) to an author

34. PR (publicist) to an author

35. Fiction translator

36. Audiobook narrator

37. Audiobook sound engineer/producer

38. Review writer

39. Blurb writer

40. Freelance journalist

41. Freelance features writer

42. Technical writer (often writing instruction manuals)

Editing

43. Story outline critique editor (often call themselves developmental editors because they’re scared of making authors do big rewrites)

44. Developmental editor

45. Line editor

46. Copyeditor

47. Proofreader

48. Beta reader

49. Academic paper editor (especially in science)

50. Academic paper copyeditor (particularly in science)

Marketing

51. Social media marketer

52. Marketing consultant

53. Branding consultant

54. SEO (search engine optimization) expert

55. Digital marketer

56. Publicist/PR specialist

57. Running a review procurement site (managing a team of reviewers)

58. Market researcher

59. Market research survey taker

Graphic Design

60. Graphic designer

61. Book cover designer

62. Logo designer (sometimes call themselves branding consultants but graphics are only a tiny part of overall branding)

63. Product packaging graphic designer

64. Product label designer

65. Facebook advert designer

66. Product designer

67. Estate agent/Property developer graphic designer (designing 2D and 3D visualizations/models of new homes etc)

68. Picture book illustrator

69. T-shirt graphic designer (surprisingly profitable)

70. Decal designer

71. Political graphic designer (part of a team behind those successful campaigns)

72. Leaflet/flyer designer

73. Infographic designer (big money if you’re good at researching these as well as designing them)

Education

74. Online school tutor

75. Online English teacher

76. Online English conversationalist

77. Online languages teacher

78. Online skills teacher

79. Educational consultant

80. Textbook writer

81. Science diagram designer

82. Baby yoga teacher

83. Baby music teacher

84. Baby sign language teacher

85. Online cookery teacher

86. Online business/marketing teacher

87. Learning mentor

88. Tutor/educator for a distance learning college

Computer Science

89. App designer (conceptualizing it or making it look nice)

90. App developer (coding)

91. Web designer (which should be called “web designer and programmer”)

92. Object-oriented programmer

93. Internet of Things Developer

94. Robotics programmer

95. Robotics engineer

96. Security expert

97. Networking expert (usually CISCO)

98. Online tech support

99. Video games designer

100. Video games programmer

101. Video games tester (this is a real job)

102. Video game composer

103. Video game voice actor

104. Web page translator

105. Online customer service

106. Computing language creator

107. Compiler developer

Photography

108. Wedding photographer

109. Landscape photographer

110. Wildlife photographer

111. Product photographer (huge market for people with the skills for this as other side-hustlers need top notch photos of their products and they’re not always great at taking them or editing them after)

112. Photojournalist

113. Stock photo photographer

114. Photography consultant

115. Fashion photographer

116. Baby/family photographer

117. Headshot photographer

118. Corporate photographer

119. School photographer

120. Photo product maker (custom mousepads, T-shirts etc)

Crafts

121. Jewellery maker

122. Soap maker

123. Candle maker

124. Furniture repair/restorer

125. Antique restorer

126. Potter/ceramics maker

127. Glass blower

128. Stained glass window restorer

129. Stonemason

130. Sculptor

131. Topiary maker

132. Garden landscaper

133. Carpenter/woodwork craftsman

134. Clothing maker/dressmaker

135. Clothing alterations/tailoring

136. Shoe repairs

137. Soft toy maker

138. Toymaker

139. Flower arranger for events

140. Artificial flower maker/paper flower maker

141. Ornament creator

142. Picture framer

143. Product illustrator

144. Keyring creator

145. Leatherworker

146. Greetings cards maker

147. Metalworker/Brass maker (door knockers, handles etc)

148. Fine artist

149. Microbrewery

150. Micro-Distillery

151. Confectioner

152. Clock repair

153. Musical instrument restorer

Events

154. Cocktail designer

155. Balloon arranger

156. Wedding singer

157. Wedding musician

158. Cake designer/baker

159. Caterer

160. Invitation designer/printer

161. Occasion make up artist

162. Occasion hair stylist

163. Professional mourner (for funerals)

164. Wedding planner

165. Events planner

166. Soft play hire

Entertainment

167. DJ

168. Party performer (e.g. character princess or superhero)

169. Stage magician

170. Street magician

171. Stand-up comedian

172. Street performer

173. Busker

174. Clown

175. Mime

176. Puppet show performer

177. Dance teacher (wedding couples sometimes hire these to choreograph the first dance)

178. Ice sculptor

Animals

179. Petsitter

180. Dog groomer

181. Dog walker

182. Horse stable assistant

183. Fish feeder (for people on vacay)

184. Sport

185. Fitness instructor

186. Nutrition adviser

Why Daisy Ridley shouldn’t play Lara Croft.

So I saw yesterday that apparently Daisy Ridley is in talks to play Lara Croft. Because, y’know, she’s got brown hair and has been filmed running around.

daisy ridley
Daisy Ridley will not make a good Lara Croft for another 10 years or so.

When are the people making Tomb Raider movies going to get it through their thick skulls that they are doing it wrong? They just keep repeating the same mistakes.  I’ve seen a lot of changes since I started following the Tomb Raider franchise in 1996, but this is utterly ridiculous.

Lara is English. She should be played by an English actress, they’ve got as far as working that out. However, there’s plenty of English actresses other than Daisy Ridley. They can run around and point guns at stuff just as well as American women, it’s not a “talent” that’s unique to Daisy. Not only that, but any English actress will be able to point out anachronisms in the script “we don’t usually eat that food, we don’t actually say that phrase” etc.

The main issue is that Lara is 29 in the first game. Twenty. Nine.  She gets older as time goes on.  Her official date of birth was February 14th, 1967 until the marketers stepped in and de-aged her.  Because, y’know, women aren’t allowed to age, we hit 25 then they rewind and rewrite the history and get a new actress to play the part, redesign the video game character, all that jazz.  But Lara started out as 29 and she aged 1 year in every subsequent game up to Tomb Raider Chronicles (Tomb Raider 5) where it gets a bit confused due to her being thought dead.  Of course, women stop ageing when they’re believed to be dead and it was implied (but never stated) that the clock rewound at some point because Angelina Jolie was too young when she played Lara.  Why make the same mistake again?

Hiring someone who is 23 but looks 16 isn’t going to make a great Tomb Raider movie. She needs some gravitas.  If you don’t understand this, think about an analogy – would you hire a 23 year old actor to play James Bond? It’s exactly the same.  The role of James Bond generally goes to someone aged in their very late thirties or early forties, and they play him through their forties and sometimes into their fifties.  Lara has life experience, she’s supposed to be laid back and a bit sassy, and (here’s the really important part) in her original bio, she was completely self made. She got disinherited and EARNED her money from writing travel books. You need time to establish that sort of money.

In order to win the all-important over-21 female audience, you are going to need to give them something inspirational, instead of sending the message out (yet again) that women’s lives are over at 25 and they’ve peaked.  The reason Lara did so well with the female demographic in the first place (in the video games, and she really did) is because it was the first time we’d had a character like that; older, smart, physically active, totally independent AND didn’t feel the need to look like a man to make it in the world (but wasn’t frilly and uber feminine either).  Give us Lara Croft at her actual age with someone who can really get inside the character, and I promise you, it’ll do MUCH better than whatever you’ve got planned.

Lara’s physical appearance is wrong for Daisy Ridley. Her hair is a medium brown (and in the original games she had a henna rinse). Angelina Jolie’s hair was nearly black. What’s the point in them making such a big fuss about the physical characteristics such as boobs and waist, and then consistently getting the hair wrong?

The marketing geniuses behind the Tomb Raider films seems to think that tokenistic Britishisms and the right costume are all they need, and that they should just throw it at some popular-today actress. They probably don’t understand why Cradle of Life flopped. Lena Headey would be the ideal Lara Croft in every way shape and form.  If they need more suggestions, Keira Knightley would be a MUCH better choice than Daisy Ridley; her face looks exactly right and she is a good age to play Lara convincingly, or how about Emilia Clarke (who also played Sarah Connor), these are fantastic English actresses who could really do the role some justice.  If they consider hiring an American actress (given my reservations outlined above), they should be looking in the direction of Angelina Goddamn Jolie. Really they need someone over 30 with enough life experience to actually make a credible Lara Croft, and maybe some experience in a similar role.  The only obvious reason I can think of for why they’re not considering Keira Knightley is boob size.  And that’s a disgraceful excuse.

Actress Knightley poses as she arrives for the European premiere of the film "The Imitation Game" at the BFI opening night gala at Leicester Square in London
Keira Knightley is the right age and she has the right appearance to play Lara Croft.

lena headey
Lena Headey would make a MUCH better Lara Croft than Daisy Ridley.

Lara Croft is Sarah Connor without kids. She’s not some petulant and 2-dimensional little girl who lives off daddy’s money and got into daddy’s gun cupboard. If you look at the original bio before it all got sanitized and changed to fit the films, the conflict between Lara and her parents (and getting disinherited) is what drives her to be so independent. Without it, you’ve just got an uber-wealthy spoilt brat running around third world countries damaging old stuff. Not only that, but she’s supposed to be tongue in cheek, like James Bond or Indiana Jones.  She has balls.

Characterization is where they went badly wrong with the first two films – they just didn’t understand the character when they wrote the script, turned her into some laughable idea of British Upper Class and, while the first film pulled through due to canny marketing and product deals, the second one flopped. Nobody even knew when it was out because all the advertising posters didn’t have the date on them.

They need to return to the original character concept – it worked for Batman, there you have a strong body of evidence that the modern audience wants authenticity, not some popular-culture influenced, re-styled version of the original idea. It doesn’t need to appeal to 14 year olds, it needs to appeal to twenty-and-thirty-somethings who own action figures, because the rest of the market will follow where they lead when it comes to things like this, and they will determine whether the film becomes a classic or is totally forgotten in a year’s time.  It all starts with hiring the right actress to play Lara Croft.

Marketers aren’t usually this stupid. They know how the audience thinks and they know how to market things. If they’re hiring Daisy Ridley for this, there’s something wider going on here – they want it to fail. Why? Because if they can’t reboot Tomb Raider then it’s proof positive that consumers don’t want female action heroes. Ghostbusters was a shockingly fake nod to “diversity” and following it up the next year with a terrible Tomb Raider movie will really turn public opinion against female action protagonists. Which means they can get back in the kitchen and bake cakes instead.

Edit: To reflect Lena Headey’s nationality, I have amended this article.  She really is the ultimate Lara Croft.

Want more about my Lara Croft obsession? Tutorial: Three classic Lara hairstyles.

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