Vegan Breastmilk Lotion Bar

This recipe doesn’t use any animal products (unless you count the breastmilk) and is based on (but not exactly the same as) my easy vegan hair conditioner/lotion bar recipe.

If you are breastfeeding and want to try making cosmetics, this is a fun one to try. It’s super thick when it goes on your skin so perfect for hard skin on your feet, chafing or sore areas, and knees and elbows. Otherwise, due to the low melting point you can use it like a Lush massage bar (I use it on my C-section scar and rub the oil in using gentle circular movements; I’ve been doing this since 7 months post CS). If you use this on oily areas, it can cause spots as it’s very rich.

I haven’t tried this out on babies so I don’t know how it would go. My baby has super-sensitive skin and I find he is fine with the melt and pour breastmilk soap and otherwise I apply breastmilk directly from my boob to his skin if he gets a rash. However, everyone’s baby is different and yours may be more sensitive than mine (or have different allergies).

Once the breastmilk has gone in, this is 100% a lotion bar not a conditioner (breastmilk is super-cleansing for hair but not very conditioning, despite the fact it’s great for skin).

This recipe doesn’t use a huge amount of breastmilk, but it’s little and powerful when combined with the rest of the ingredients. This bar is scented. If you prefer unscented (e.g. if you have very sensitive skin), leave out the lavender oil and it will smell like a combination of the other ingredients (when I make this unscented, mine has a strong shea/cocoa butter smell).

This recipe makes 1 bar of lotion in a standard rectangular mold.

You will need:

  • A glass jug
  • A spoon for mixing
  • A soap mould
  • 40g shea butter
  • 30g olive wax
  • 20g cocoa butter
  • 20g coconut oil
  • 10ml breastmilk
  • 10ml avocado oil
  • 15 drops lavender oil

Method (no microwave… scroll for microwave method)

  1. In a saucepan, boil some water and place your glass jug in it.
  2. Add the cocoa butter and olive wax as these take the most heat to melt.
  3. When they have melted, add the rest of the ingredients except the lavender oil and breastmilk.
  4. Once the whole lot has melted, remove jug from saucepan, add breastmilk, lavender oil and mix well.
  5. Pour the mixture into your soap mould and leave it to harden. This takes about 2-3 hours.
  6. Pop it out of the mould. Wrap to keep moisture out immediately and it’s ready to use!

Microwave method:

  1. Put the cocoa butter and olive wax in the microwave and heat in 30-second bursts until they have melted.
  2. Add the rest of the ingredients except the breastmilk and lavender oil. Heat in 20-second bursts until everything has melted.
  3. Add the breastmilk and lavender, pour into a mould and leave to harden for 2-3 hours.
  4. Pop out of mold. Wrap. Enjoy.

This bar may crack after hardening. This usually happens when it cooled too fast. It’s still usable if this happens. Don’t melt it again after adding breastmilk or essential oils as it will denature the breastmilk/essential oil and speed up expiry.

This bar has unpasteurized breast milk in, so will last about 2-3 weeks before it might go off. You can prevent this by adding preservatives, but I haven’t tried those or researched them (except to know they exist and are mandatory in all liquid cosmetics sold in the EU) so I can’t recommend any.

Breastmilk Face Mask Recipe

Just in case it wasn’t exciting enough that you can make breastmilk soap, you can also make a DIY purifying breast milk face mask which is so easy, you can even do it in a campervan! Here’s my recipe for a fabulous breastmilk face mask, which you can make at home or in your van!

You will need:

Bentonite clay powder

About 30ml expressed breast milk.

A bowl

A spoon

Method:

In the bowl, mix about 3 teaspoons of bentonite clay with about 30ml expressed breast milk. Everyone’s milk consistency is different, so you may need more milk or more clay powder. Once you have a fine paste, you can apply it straight to cleansed skin.

Relax!

Leave on for about 10 minutes then wash off in water. I know people say that with clay masks you should wait for the clay to dry before washing it off, but I find with my dry skin, this is too much, so I opt for taking any clay masks off before they’ve fully hardened. If you have oilier skin, you may prefer to leave the mask on for longer. I also tend to use cold water to wash off clay masks (perfect for vanlife haha) because it closes the pores.

Pat face dry then put on your essence and moisture. Your face may be a little pink after using this mask so this is beauty maintenance for an at-home day, not a pre-wedding mask (opt for a sheet mask before a big event, instead, as they deliver quick-fixes).

Easy breastmilk soap recipe

Do you have excess breastmilk or oversupply of breastmilk? Perhaps you are looking for a way to preserve your breastmilk or turn it into a beautiful gift? If you’re anything like me, after six months or a year of breastfeeding, you have a freezer full of breastmilk and you want to do something with that liquid gold!

A breastmilk pendant is a beautiful idea but let’s be fair, it doesn’t use much of that milk. You’ll still have boatloads of the stuff left!

In New York beauty salons, breastmilk is seen as the “miracle ingredient” that can work wonders for your skin. People pay hundreds of dollars for breastmilk facials. Midwives often tell new mothers to put breastmilk on their sore nipples in the early days because of its amazing moisturising properties.

I have so much milk sitting around. I tried giving it away to hungry babies three months ago, and I didn’t get any takers in my small country. Instead, I decided to try turning it into various beauty products. Some came out better than others. Don’t make the mistakes I did. If you’re looking for a really quick and easy thing to do with your leftover breastmilk, here’s a fabulous simple melt and pour breastmilk soap recipe.

It uses something called melt and pour soap base, which is ready made for you to turn into soap. All you have to do is follow this easy breastmilk recipe to get the most creamy and cleansing bars of soap you ever tried! It’s also sulphate free and paraben free!

You will need:

A silicone soap mould I have these ones but you can get identical ones in the US here.

Stephenson’s melt and pour SLS free soap base available in the US here or here in the UK.

A microwaveable or heat proof glass jug (you need at least 500ml/1 pint, available here in the US and here in UK but they’re cheaper in Tesco if you’re near one).

A spatula for mixing (any non-metal spatula or wooden spoon will work).

A sharp knife to cut the soap base (any kitchen knife will be fine as long as it hasn’t blunted and the handle is safely attached to the blade).

Breastmilk.

The soap base is sold in boxes of 1kg and if you wanted to turn all of it into breastmilk soap you would need 500ml of breastmilk, but do not worry if you have less breastmilk. To make it as easy as possible, I’ve done this in 250g blocks of melt and pour soap base, which is a quarter of a tub and will fill your soap mould.

Method:

  1. Cut the 1kg block of Stephenson’s melt and pour SLS free organic soap base into quarters with a knife
  2. Taking one quarter of the soap base (roughly 250 grams), chop it into small squares and melt it in a glass jug in the microwave or put the glass jug into a pan of hot water just like you would if you were melting chocolate to make chocolate krispy cakes. Microwave on a low heat (I go for the lowest setting) for about 2 mins, check, then put it back in, checking every 30 seconds to 1 minute until it’s melted.
  3. Once the soap base is melted, add 125ml of cold (but not frozen) breastmilk and stir it well to get it all to mix.
  4. Pour your mixture into your soap mould. You can put it into the fridge to solidify faster, but don’t leave it more than an hour as melt and pour soap base contains glycerin which will start to draw moisture out of your fridge and make the soaps less solid!
  5. Once your soaps have solidified, turn them out and wrap them. Most people advocate putting them in plastic wrap such as saran wrap, but I prefer beeswax paper or baking paper as these are better for the environment.
  6. Use your soap! I found this to be super-moisturizing compared to store-bought soaps.

I love this straightforward and easy breastmilk soap recipe but I have made a few others, too, which I will post in the future.

breastmilk soap1